Horrifying Video Shows Mum High On Spice Convulsing As Son Cries

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9VrUrJL6Q0

Distressing footage showing the moment a woman allegedly high on drugs convulses on the floor, while ignoring the cries of her two-year-old son, has emerged online.

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Police have identified the woman as Lauren Brooke Englett, and in the horrifying video she can be seen writhing around as a man slumps on the sofa after handing the toddler a bottle, the Mirror reports.

She reportedly told officers she had taken a synthetic form of cannabis known as spice, which caused her catatonic state. In the clip the toddler stands over Englett, who appears to be having a seizure. At one stage, she almost falls down the porch steps as her son continues to cry.

Young mum caught high on drugs Horrifying Video Shows Mum High On Spice Convulsing As Son CriesFacebook

After the video went viral on Facebook several people contacted the Alabama Mobile County Sheriff’s Office to report the incident.

Lori Myles, public affairs officer for the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office, said: “We received hundreds of emails. The furthest was from Birmingham, England.”

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Ms Myles added that the police had arrested Englett on February 29 and the child has been placed in care. They claim she was cooperative and admitted to being on spice in the video.

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Young mum caught high on drugs 1 Horrifying Video Shows Mum High On Spice Convulsing As Son CriesFacebook

Englett has been charged with domestic violence and reckless endangerment. The sheriff’s office is also seeking two more people, Jamie Jemison and Rachel Rikard in relation to the incident.

Spice is an illegal synthetic cannabis made from dried plant material and chopped up herbs.

Lauren Brooke Englett Horrifying Video Shows Mum High On Spice Convulsing As Son CriesMobile County Sheriff

Side effects of the drug include intense cravings, vomiting, extreme agitation, psychotic episodes including hallucinations and even heart attacks, according to SpiceAddictionSupport.org.

The UK has continued to ban new synthetic cannabinoids as they come to market but they are typically replaced by other legal highs.


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The Mirror

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