Play Your Old Game Boy Games On The New Super Retro Boy

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Huge thanks to @destructoid for presenting the #SuperRetroBoy with the BEST New Tech of #CES2017 Award!

A photo posted by Retro-Bit GO RETRO!® (@retrobitgaming) on

If you’re the sort of person who is wary of change, hasn’t switched to contactless yet, lives in fear of new tech and thinks the PS4 Pro is a little too shiny, Retro-Bit Gaming has the answer.

The company has earned its name rebooting old consoles for a modern nostalgia-driven audience, and their new gaming console has raised the beloved GameBoy back from the dead after a year in production.

Retro-Bit’s Super Retro Boy performs almost identical functions as Nintendo’s original, and is even designed to look and feel exactly like playing your old GameBoy.

This console is so alike in function and aesthetic, presumably it also has the power to actually transport you back to your claw-fingered childhood.

It works with all the old cartridges designed for the Game Boy, Game Boy Color, and Game Boy Advance.

Luckily, the console is slightly lighter than Nintendo’s, which should suit the arthritic hands us gamers have succumbed to in our old age.

The new #SuperRetroBoy offers a rechargeable battery and textured side grips for hours of entertainment!

A photo posted by Retro-Bit GO RETRO!® (@retrobitgaming) on

As an added bonus, it can bring back a little sliver of your youth in rainbow high definition, as the interface comes with a colour screen.

Although, beware: It’s an added bonus that will basically taint your childhood memories sepia, making you feel as old as your folks.

But the Super Retro Boy isn’t an exact clone; rather, the hardware was intended to capture the essence of the Game Boy while adding a 10-hour internal battery.

It was unveiled at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. So far, the reviews are as glowing as that backlit screen.

The Super Retro Boy comes in black or white and will cost £65 ($80) and Retro-Bit are taking pre-orders now, for shipping in August 2017.


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The Verge

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