Sailors Rescued From Remote Desert Island Thanks To Hollywood Style SOS

By : Ben HaywardTwitterLogo

0 Shares
sos1 Sailors Rescued From Remote Desert Island Thanks To Hollywood Style SOSFacebook

Two sailors have been miraculously rescued after the giant ‘SOS’ they wrote in the sand was spotted by the U.S Navy. 

The pair, named as Linus and Sabina Jack were stranded on a tiny, remote, uninhabited island in the Pacific Ocean for over a week, reports The Telegraph. 

Advertisement

Linus and Sabina were picked up from the Micronesian island in Chuuk State on after a U.S Navy aircraft crew spotted their desperate plea for help.

sos3 Sailors Rescued From Remote Desert Island Thanks To Hollywood Style SOSFacebook

The couple – in their fifties – had been missing for a week after they departed Weno island for Tamatam island, but failed to arrive the following day.

With only limited supplies and no emergency equipment the alarm was raised and their rescue marked the end of a seven-day search by an international team of 14 boats and two aircraft covering a huge 16,571 square miles.

A ship first spotted lights flashing from the remote area at night, leading to the navy plane being deployed.

Urgent assistance requested by the US Coast Guard! Last night, Sector Guam Command Center provided a trackline search…

Advertisement

Posted by US Embassy Kolonia on Thursday, August 25, 2016

A statement from the U.S Embassy in Kolonia, the capital of the Federated States of Micronesia, said:

The Search and Rescue Operation for Linus and Sabina Jack has been successfully completed. They are found and are waiting for a ship to take them home.

The Federated States of Micronesia is made up of around 60o small islands in the Western Pacific, about 2,500 miles southwest of Hawaii.

Advertisement

sos4 Sailors Rescued From Remote Desert Island Thanks To Hollywood Style SOSFacebook

The rescue is the second in a few months after back in April, three men were saved from the island of Fanadik.

They had spelled out an enormous ‘help’ sign using palm fronds on the white sand which was spotted by the crew of a U.S Navy plane.

So it does work!


Credits

The Telegraph

Comments