Bodybuilder Died Of Cancer Following Steroid Abuse

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Bodybuilder Died Of Cancer Following Steroid Abuse bodybuilder cancer FBManchester Evening News

A fitness fanatic bodybuilder died of liver cancer caused by years of abusing anabolic steroids which helped him bulk up to more than 20 stone.

At an inquest, the coroner determined that Dean Wharmby’s misuse of the drugs were a “direct cause” of his death on July 19 this year.

Popular fitness enthusiast Dean, 39, from Rochdale, died in July after a five and a half year long battle with the illness.

Bodybuilder Died Of Cancer Following Steroid Abuse bodybuilder cancer 3Manchester Evening News

As reported by the Manchester Evening News, he first developed problems in 2010, when multiple tumours were found on his liver.

After Dean developed the health problems, however, his partner Charlotte Rigby said he stopped taking steroids and embraced spiritual healing methods such as reiki and natural medicine.

Dean and Charlotte chronicled his battle with cancer on a Facebook page called ‘Dean’s Journey’ which attracted thousands of followers, but he passed away at Springhill Hospice in the summer.

Reading her verdict, coroner Lisa Hashmi warned of the dangers of taking steroids.

Bodybuilder Died Of Cancer Following Steroid Abuse bodybuilder cancer 4Manchester Evening News

Delivering a narrative verdict, she said:

I find on the balance of probabilities that in such a fit, health-conscious young man the most probable cause of his liver tumours was the misuse of anabolic steroids. To my mind, there is a direct, causal link with Dean’s death.

Dean’s death and the precious loss of such a young life in such circumstances ought to send out a very clear message to all those involved in the body building and fitness industries. Use of anabolic steroids, which is apparently rife throughout, is not without inherent risk.

I would urge all those using and abusing such drugs to reconsider their position and ask whether it is really worth it given the life-threatening risks.


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