ISIS Document Leak Reportedly Reveals Personal Details About British Jihadis

By : Alex Mays |



A massive leak of top-secret Islamic state documents has exposed details of their global recruitment programme.

Security service have already began the task of examining the files, which are alleged to contain names, addresses and family contacts of 22,000 fighters- which included at least a dozen British recruits.

The findings have been hailed as a major setback for the terrorist organisation, as it’s provided vital intelligence for the war effort in Syria and Iraq.

isis form english

Zaman Al Wasl – a pro-opposition Syrian news website – and Sky News published a selection of the forms online showing a survey which detailed names, birth dates, nationalities, hometowns, nationalities and even blood types.

The forms also showed that prospective members were asked to choose if they wanted to be used as suicide bombers, soldiers or in another role, and to tell them about any previous jihadist experience.

Afzal Ahsraf – a visiting fellow at Nottingham University’s centre of conflict, security and terrorism – told The Independent

It will be a great blow for their recruitment process because these documents show not just the people joining but the networks involved in radicalising them and facilitating their travel. Any recruit will know they are very likely to be discovered and there will be serious consequences for them, it doesn’t inspire a great deal of confidence. It will cause a great deal of disruption. This is the worst news for Isis in a very long time.

Abdel Majed Abdel Bary 1

Despite some of these fighters already being known including British members Abdel Bary, Junaid Hussain and Reyaad Khan, many more are expected to be new to the security services.

The majority of the European extremists on the list were from France, followed by Germany and the UK. It’s believed four were from the U.S and six from Canada.

Reyaad Khan 1

According to police at least 700 people from the UK have travelled to support or fight for jihadist groups in Syria and Iraq, with about half returning.


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