This Is Why You Always Want A Beer When You Watch The Euros

By : Ben HaywardTwitterLogo

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If you’re watching Euro 2016 and find yourself wanting a beer, it’s not all because England are so awful.

According to a study by charity, Alcohol Concern, during England and Wales’ five group matches pitch-side adverts for the tournament’s sponsor, Carlsberg, appeared a total of 392 times, reports the Huffington Post.

This works out to an alcohol-related advert once every 72 seconds – which Alcohol Concern has warned could promote unhealthy behaviour among fans, particularly those aged under 18.

This Is Why You Always Want A Beer When You Watch The Euros footy2Getty

Tom Smith, director of campaigns at Alcohol Concern, said the volume of alcohol marketing in sports popular with young people is ‘enormous’.

He said:

We already know from our previous research that half of children associate leading beers with football. Sport should be something which inspires active participation and good health, not more drinking.

Based on stats for previous tournaments, it is thought that around two million under 18s watched England’s opener against Russia.

This Is Why You Always Want A Beer When You Watch The Euros footy3Getty

Mr Smith believes they should be protected:

The government needs to implement the phased removal of alcohol marketing from sport, as it has done with tobacco.

France’s laws on alcohol advertising prohibit alcohol sponsorship of sporting events and alcohol advertising on television.

Carlsberg was able to get around this by replacing their brand name on pitch-side adverts with one of their well-known slogans, in the Carlsberg font.

This essentially meant their adverts were regularly visible to viewers – even on the BBC – where paid-for advertising is banned.

This Is Why You Always Want A Beer When You Watch The Euros carlsbergCarlsberg

A Carlsberg spokesman told The Guardian:

We take great care that the majority of viewers of our marketing are above legal drinking age.

Our internal and industry codes clearly stipulate that our marketing communication are designed to prevent any primarily underage appeal.

Well that’s good of them.


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