These Are The ‘Sexist’ Nicknames Women Hate The Most

By : Jennifer Browne |


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The pet names that women hate the most have been revealed, and ‘bird’, ‘doll’, and ‘chick’ top the list.

‘Hormonal’, ‘bitchy’, ‘drama queen’, ‘ball breaker’ and ‘diva’ were also among the other hated ‘sex slurs’.

The study of 2,000 UK women found nearly a third of women aged 16-24 have been told to ‘man up’ by work colleagues and found that women felt their strength as a female was undermined four times a day.

The research is part of Special K’s new ‘Strength Is…’ campaign, fronted by ambassadors including TV presenter Katie Piper, pop star Nicola Roberts and actress Lisa Faulkner, The Mirror reports.

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Ex- Girls Aloud star Nicola, 30, said:

It is a strange thing that in a modern society we still have room for language that holds strong women back.

It is very important young women in society grow up learning that you are not a ‘ball breaker’. If you are successful – you are simply a strong woman succeeding.

Women should not allow themselves to be referred to as anything other than who they are in a professional setting.

Those surveyed also condemned words aimed at silencing women such as ‘feminazi’ and ‘baron’.

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According to the survey’s results, here are the top five pet names women want banned:

1. Bird – 56 per cent

2. Doll – 45 per cent

3. Chick – 42 per cent

4. Babe – 38 per cent

5. Queen Bee – 33 per cent

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And the top five words women would ban:

1. Hormonal – 68 per cent

2. Drama Queen – 56 per cent

3. Bitchy – 53 per cent

4. High Maintenance – 51 per cent

5. Hysterical – 50 per cent

Others included ‘attention seeking’, ‘manipulative’, ‘controlling’ and ‘ball breaker’.

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Louise Thompson Davies, from Special K, said the campaign was about ‘inspiring inner strength in women’

She said the responses lifted the lid on the lack of ‘strong female’ representation in society, with 51 per cent of Brits believing a strong women is viewed negatively in today’s world.

Special K said: “We hope to help change the language used and celebrate what makes women feel strong.”

Female strength is something to be celebrated and encouraged. So if getting rid of this sort of language empowers women, let’s do it.