US Government Deported Up To 83 Migrants To Their Deaths Since 2014

By : Kieron Curtis |


UNILAD Screen Shot 2015 10 13 at 00.23.116US Customs and Border Protection/Flickr

It had been feared that the potential arrival of Donald Trump in the White House would bring about harsh changes for US migrants, but according to a recent study many deportees are already paying the ultimate price.

According to The Guardian an academic study will soon reveal up to 83 deported migrants were killed upon reaching their homelands.

The findings have led to criticisms of the US for not fulfilling its duty to assist refugees who are genuinely at risk.

The murders centred on the Central American nations of Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, with some of the recorded deaths occurring just days after people being expelled from the US.

The report was compiled by Elizabeth Kennedy, a social scientist from San Diego state university, by analysing local news reports from the impoverished nations.

She said:

These figures tell us that the US is returning people to their deaths in violation of national and international law. Most of the individuals reported to have been murdered lived in some of the most violent towns in some of the most violent countries in the world – suggesting strongly that is why they fled.”

UNILAD Screen Shot 2015 10 13 at 00.19.5914US Customs and Border Protection/Flickr

The government has been quick to justify their actions with a spokesperson for the Department of Homeland Security saying all deportees have the chance to seek asylum if they can prove fear of harm on grounds of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion.

SY Lee said:

Each year, thousands are admitted to this country as part of the overseas refugee program or granted asylum by the DHS or by the Department of Justice.”

It doesn’t seem to matter where you go in the world there are people desperately seeking refuge in developed nations. Clearly there is need for a worldwide review on migration policy so as to avoid further preventable deaths.


The Guardian