Scientists Have Discovered Terrifying ‘Jacuzzi Of Despair’

By :

0 Shares

Deep at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico is a deadly pool that is capable of killing nearly anything that accidentally swims into it’s warm salty waters.

The deadly pool is known as the Jacuzzi of Despair and is an underground lake made up of a toxic gooey brine that’s five times saltier than the surrounding water and twice the temperature of the surrounding ocean.

Advertisement

Surprisingly the heat of the killer lake isn’t what makes it so deadly, it’s the salinity of the water which kills almost anything that tries to swim through it, The Inertia reports.

3336UNILAD imageoptim brine 2 Scientists Have Discovered Terrifying Jacuzzi Of DespairYouTube

The salinity of the water forced it to sink where it mixed with hydrogen sulfide on the sea floor forming a toxic soup.

The 100 feet around and 12 feet deep pool was discovered back in 2014 by a scientist called Erik Cordes while he was researching coral at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico.

While using a robotic probe to map the bottom of the sea he discovered a ring of dead crabs surrounding the pool, he returned the next year with a team to take a better look at the toxic lake.

Advertisement

33209UNILAD imageoptim brine 1 Scientists Have Discovered Terrifying Jacuzzi Of DespairYouTube

Cordes described the pool:

You go down into the underside of the ocean and you’re looking at a lake or a river flowing.

It seems like you aren’t on this world. We have been in a position to see the primary opening of a canyon … we noticed the brine falling over this wall like a dam.

Advertisement

It was this stunning pool of purple white and black colors.

50758UNILAD imageoptim brine 3 Scientists Have Discovered Terrifying Jacuzzi Of DespairYouTube

Despite the water being as deadly as a particularly hungry shark some creatures can survive the environments including a huge bed of mussels and a bacteria in their gills that eat the hydrogen sulfide.

I don’t recommend going for a swim though…


Credits

The Inertia

Comments