Five Things The Premier League Taught Us This Weekend

By : Marley AndersonTwitterLogo

0 Shares
0
Shares



Townsend Palace Five Things The Premier League Taught Us This WeekendScott Heppell/Getty

There are two games to go in the title race, and it’s edgy as ever at the top of the table.

Leicester City passed up their first chance to win the title as they drew with Manchester United, leaving the London derby between Tottenham Hotspur and Chelsea on Monday night as the fixture that could decide where the title lies.

Elsewhere, Newcastle United moved another step closer to safety, while Arsenal scraped past Norwich to keep their love affair with fourth place going strong.

Aston Villa put in another typical performance to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory, while Everton stopped their losing streak with a win against Bournemouth.

Advertisement

Here’s what we learned from the weekend’s action:

Morgan v man u getty Five Things The Premier League Taught Us This WeekendGetty

Leicester Must Wait A Little Longer

The story of the weekend surrounded Leicester, who could have clinched the Premier League title with a win over Man United at Old Trafford.

The Theatre of Dreams wasn’t about to be the scene of the fairytale though, as Louis van Gaal’s side dug their heels in and held the Foxes to a 1-1 draw.

Wes Morgan’s header ensured his side’s wait went on for another 30 hours at least, as Spurs and Chelsea go head to head on Monday night to potentially send the trophy to the King Power Stadium – and how Chelsea fans would love that.

A draw or defeat for Spurs would complete the magical triumph for Claudio Ranieri’s side, it’s just a pity that it might not be won on the pitch.

Defoe Sunderland Getty Five Things The Premier League Taught Us This WeekendTom Dulat/Getty

Sunderland Just Won’t Go Away

With the relegation dogfight hotting up, Sunderland’s trip to Stoke was a must win.

Marko Arnautovic’s strike looked to have done Sam Allardyce no favours, but Geoff Cameron’s clumsy challenge on Jermain Defoe in injury time gave Sunderland a much needed lifeline.

Defoe stuck the penalty away to give the Black Cats a vital point – one that doesn’t lift them out of the relegation zone – but does leave them within touching distance of rivals Newcastle United, who beat Crystal Palace.

It’s almost like Sunderland are calling upon their wealth of experience of being shit to help them out of this situation.

Advertisement

Deeney Getty Five Things The Premier League Taught Us This WeekendIan Watson/Getty

Aston Villa Can Reach New Lows

It’s been a shocking season for Aston Villa, but against Watford it looked like Eric Black was going to oversee a rare three points for his side.

2-1 up with three minutes to go, what could possibly go wrong?

Troy Deeney, that’s what.

The Watford Captain smashed in a penalty to give the Hornets what looked like a point, before heading in a late winner to ensure the world continued to laugh at Villa for another week.

Mark Noble getty Five Things The Premier League Taught Us This WeekendIan Griffiths/Getty

Mark Noble Can Score Goals – But Still Won’t Go To The Euros

It’s hard not to feel a bit sorry for Mark Noble.

He’s had an excellent season, and just when people were tipping him to eventually be recognised by England, Danny Drinkwater comes along and pips him to a squad place.

Lately, Noble has banged in four goals in two games to keep West Ham’s hunt for a Europa League place on course, but it all looks too late to gatecrash Roy Hodgson’s Euro squad.

With Jack Wilshere returning to fitness and ultimately being more fancied by Roy, Noble looks to be one of those players who will never earn an international cap, despite being good enough to.

Advertisement

Jonathan Leko Getty Five Things The Premier League Taught Us This WeekendJames Griffiths/Getty

We’re All Old As Fuck

There’s literally nothing about West Bromwich Albion that makes them interesting.

But on Saturday, Tony Pulis awarded a debut to Jonathan Leko – the first player to ever play in the Premier League born in 1999.

Yes, 1999 – the year that Manchester United won the treble, the Millennium Dome opened, and MySpace and Napster were launched.

The teenager was excellent as well, giving Aaron Cresswell a headache on the right wing and looking a threat for the full 90 minutes.

I don’t want to say what I was doing when I was 17, but it involves some bad driving and questionable musical tastes.

Comments