Clumsy Baby Gorilla Takes Tumble From Tree While Eating

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Baby gorilla falls out of treeNewsflare

You know how it is when you’ve got a tasty snack and the world around you seems to melt away.

Give me a bowl of ice cream or a big slice of cake and my senses will usually be too overwhelmed with happiness to process anything else.

Which is why activities such as tree climbing are usually not advised while nibbling on a giant bar of Galaxy.

However, for one baby gorilla climbing while snacking is a fact of life. Not a good combination when you’re the clumsy sort…

Footage shot in Uganda’s Biwindi National Park shows the adorable baby gorilla scaling a precariously scrawny tree.

Although just a baba, this is a stocky, muscular little fellow and you can see the piddly little branches bend under his weight as he climbs up and up.

Unperturbed, the determined young ape pushed onwards and upwards; completely focused on seeking the tastiest leaves on the tree.

He makes a grab for a large green leaf, stuffing it hungrily into his mouth. However, while he is still munching away, he makes the mistake of leaning a little too heavily on a skinny branch…

To the precious baba’s great surprise, the branch is pushed towards the ground, bringing him down with it.

Luckily, the chunky cutey was able to hold on tight with his deft hands; allowing for a gentler tumble.

Only his dignity appeared hurt as he swung forlornly at the bottom of the tree; having learned his first lesson in the cruelties of gravity. I just want to give this little chap a great big cuddle…

This fluffy angel lives in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, a UNESCO world heritage site in southwest Uganda. The lush forest area provides a habitat for over half of the earth’s remaining Mountain Gorilla population.

According to the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park website:

They are highly endangered because of poaching, habitat loss and diseases.

This national park generates one of the highest revenues to Uganda Wildlife Authority amongst all the safari parks in Uganda. Gorilla trekking here requires a permit that costs $600 each and can be purchased from Uganda Wildlife Authority offices in Kamwokya, Kampala – Uganda.

This money goes towards the further conservation of mountain gorillas hence, try to look at the money you are spending on permits in a perspective of helping these endangered mountain gorillas grow and multiply in numbers.

Despite being critically endangered, conservation efforts have gone some way to protect mountain gorillas.

According to Gorilla Doctors, a mountain gorilla veterinary project, there are now 1,004 mountain gorillas living in the wild compared to just 480 back in 2010. This is the highest number on record, and is certainly cause for tentative celebration.

Gorilla Doctors’ Africa Director, Mike Cranfield, said:

These numbers are truly remarkable, far exceeding our expectations, and are the result of a collaborative, three-country effort with governments and partners all playing an important role.

While it once seemed likely we would lose these beautiful animals forever, there is now cautious hope for their future.

Find out more about how you can help here.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via [email protected]