Firefighters Rescue Mountain Lion Stuck Up Tree

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Mountain lion found up tree in California.California Department Of Fish And Wildlife

Every pet cat sees himself or herself as a household tiger, prowling around their neighbourhood in search of wild adventures.

Many cat owners can relate to their beloved feline companion excitably clambering up a tree in pursuit of a pesky bird, only to find themselves stranded on the tippity-top branch.

Suddenly their jungle fantasy implodes and they are simply a timid little kitty again, miaowing for help and missing the comfort of their human’s strokes.

And it would seem this paw-ful predicament also extends to their bigger, toothier cousins, who can also find themselves tree bound and freaked out.

Firefighters in California have rescued a young mountain lion, who was spotted resting on a branch of a tree, approximately 50ft (15m) above the ground, just outside a private residence on February 16.

The big lad was spotted by the owner of the property while they were out working in their garden. I can only imagine how many freshly filled plant pots were smashed as they rushed to call emergency services.

A fire engine crew arrived at the property approximately seven minutes later, and the surrounding area was secured to ensure public safety.

Of course, this was no normal ‘cat up a tree’ scenario, and a careful strategy had to be implemented. At around 4:20pm, the lion was tranquillised and plucky firefighters were able to approach him through the use of a ladder.

The firefighters secured the tranquillised lion in a harness, and – in what was no doubt a nail-biting exercise in keeping your nerve – were able to lower him to the ground. Here, the beautiful creature was checked over biologists to make sure everything was okay.

#SBCoFD & California Department of Fish & Wildlife Crews Rescue Mountain Lion in City of Hesperia. San Bernardino…

Posted by San Bernardino County Fire on Saturday, 16 February 2019

Fish and wildlife biologist Kevin Brennan said:

It is common for young mountain lions to wander outside what some would consider normal habitat in an attempt to establish their territory.

Fish and wildlife warden Rick Fischer explained how – despite the rarity of human attacks – mountain lions have been known to go after pets and livestock, remarking:

Leaving the lion in the tree would not have been safe for the community.

Fischer revealed how the lion was safely returned back to his natural habitat after regaining consciousness, no doubt a little confused and impressed with himself for getting down from the branch.

Needless to say, if you should spot a mountain lion chilling out in your tree, don’t try and tempt it down all by yourself using Dreamies….

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