Guinness Book Of Records Crown New World’s Oldest Cat

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97500913-oldest_cat-trending-large_trans++I4i1a-7tqjMxGle8m6q3UCX2KO9Cc2W8Z6Ig2usV3IQGuinness Book of Records/ Gail Floyd

A cat has shot to international fame after after being named the world’s oldest living cat.

The Siamese cat, Scooter, from Mansfield, Texas, is 30-years-old and has been officially recognised by the The Guinness Book of Records as the world’s oldest moggy, The Telegraph reports.

To put this into perspective, if Scooter was a human he’d be a staggering 137-years-old.

Oldest-cat-Scooter-in-the-garden_tcm25-428120Guinness Book of Records/ Gail Floyd

This means the previous record holder, Corduroy, who was only crowned back in August for turning 26 years and 13-days-old, has been bumped off the top spot.

Scooter, who was born on March 26, 1986, has led an eventful life, for a cat.

At four weeks old, his mother passed away, while in October 2014, Scooter broke his leg and has been undergoing medical testing and treatment ever since.

He’s also managed to visit 45 of the 50 U.S. states, which is just impressive.

Oldest-cat-Scooter-at-Christmas_tcm25-428119Guinness Book of Records/ Gail Floyd

The ancient cat’s owner Gail Floyd believes Scooter’s advanced age is down to him keeping active, explaining he likes to wake her up at 6am every morning by jumping around on her bed.

Some of Scooter’s favourite things to do include being blow-dried after baths, snacking on chicken every other day, and enjoying visits to the nursing home where his owner’s mother lives.

oldest-living-cat-header_tcm25-391830Guinness Book of Records

The cat’s veterinarian has said Scooter is ‘an amazing cat, with a strong will to live’.

While Scooter is no doubt pleased with his achievements, he isn’t actually the oldest cat of all time. That record belongs to a another Texas cat, Crème Puff, from Austin, TX, who lived to the grand old age of 38.

Thirty-eight years of being called Crème Puff, the indignity…


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.