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Minnesota Dentist Who Killed Cecil The Lion Pictured Hunting Sheep In Mongolia

by : Julia Banim on : 11 Jul 2020 12:27
Minnesota Dentist Who Killed Cecil The Lion Pictured Hunting Sheep In MongoliaMinnesota Dentist Who Killed Cecil The Lion Pictured Hunting Sheep In MongoliaFacebook/The Mirror

The Minnesota dentist who shot and killed Cecil the Lion in 2015 has been pictured hunting sheep in Mongolia.

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Walter Palmer, 60, sparked anger across the world after killing Cecil – an endangered black-maned lion – during a trophy hunting expedition in Zimbabwe.

Now it appears Palmer has returned to the cruel ‘sport’, having been pictured with a slaughtered Altai argali – the biggest sheep on Earth – while on a trip to Mongolia with a longtime hunting companion.

CecilCecilGetty

As reported by the Mirror, Palmer paid up to £80,000 to kill the wild ram.

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Photographs of the hunt show Palmer posing with another hunter beside the body of the sheep, with his face left of the photograph. The ram is said to have been an older male, which was shot from a distance of about 30 yards using a bow and arrow.

Palmer reportedly travelled to Mongolia in 2019, with his stay lasting up to one week. Once in the country, Palmer and his friend Brent Sinclair reportedly met with local guides before going out hunting in the mountains.

Sinclair wrote the following account of their trip on his personal Facebook page at the time:

I have booked more hunting trips with this guy over the past 20 years than I can count. Together we have travelled to many far reaches of the world. We’ve seen some pretty amazing places.

[…] Thanks, Amigo for the adventure… look forward to our next one.

Wild sheepWild sheepMirror

A source has told the Mirror that Palmer, who has been hunting from an early age, had planned several more trophy hunting trips:

At the time of Cecil’s death, Walter took a back seat. But he’s been hunting ever since he was a boy. It’s a way of life to him. Walter has undertaken several hunts since Cecil’s death.

The trip to Mongolia was his idea. The ram was on his list of hunts he wanted to complete.

Dr Teresa Telecky, Wildlife Vice-President at Humane Society International, gave the following statement to the Mirror:

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For trophy hunters to travel to Mongolia to kill a beautiful and ­endangered ram is an absolute outrage.

The argali ram is a species in danger of extinction, so the idea that these animals can be killed for pleasure is abhorrent.

The killing of Cecil the lion five years ago caused international shock. But clearly the killing for kicks continues. It’s time for the law to stop wildlife killers in their tracks by banning trophy hunting.

Earlier this month, it emerged that British hunters had slaughtered at least 60 lions since the death of Cecil in 2015, with a promised UK government ban on trophy imports having been delayed yet again.

As reported by The Independent, official figures show that dozens of bodies, skins and other endangered animal parts have been brought over to the UK from Africa in this five-year period.

The number of wild lions fell from an approximate 450,000 in the 1950s to just 20,000 in 2015. Nowadays, it’s estimated there’s around 15,000, although it’s feared this figure could be as low as 13,000.

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Julia Banim

Jules studied English Literature with Creative Writing at Lancaster University before earning her masters in International Relations at Leiden University in The Netherlands (Hoi!). She then trained as a journalist through News Associates in Manchester. Jules has previously worked as a mental health blogger, copywriter and freelancer for various publications.

Topics: Animals, Cecil the Lion, Hunting, Mongolia, Now, Sheep, trophy hunting, Walter Palmer

Credits

Mirror and 1 other
  1. Mirror

    Dentist who killed Cecil the lion back hunting as new photo shows sick slaughter

  2. The Independent

    British hunters have killed at least 60 lions since Cecil shot, as ministers delay trophy imports ban again