Some Of History’s Most Iconic Photos Have Been Transformed From Black And White To Colour

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Alfred Eisenstaedt/Getty/Sanna Dullaway

Sailor kissing a nurse on ‘V-J Day’ in Times Square in 1945

Thanks to the digital process of colourisation, dozens of history’s most iconic photographs have been transformed from black and white into glorious technicolour.

And the effect is absolutely stunning and will probably make you see these historic moments in a completely new light.

The historic black and white images taken by photographers such as Eddie Adams, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Alexander Gardner, Malcolm Browne, Joe Rosenthal and Dorothea Lange infiltrated popular culture and stood the test of time.

Now, the likes of Mads Madsen of Colorized History, Sanna Dullaway, Ryan Urban, Agnoiologist and Kibblenbits have colourised the images and the results are spectacular.

From the famous 1945 Times Square kiss, to a nuclear weapons test being conducted by the United States in 1946, to the buddhist monk setting himself alight, the transformation of these incredible images makes them even more striking.

Take a trip through history and check out two dozen of the best black and white images transformed into full colour below:

Jack Delano/Library of Congress/Ryan Urban

Sgt. George Camblair learning how to use a gas mask during a practice smokescreen in 1942 at Fort Belvoir, Virginia

Eddie Adams/AP Photo/Sanna Dullaway

A Vietcong Guerrilla being executed in 1968 during the opening stages of the Tet Offensive

Library of Congress

A group of men inside one of the Hoover Dam turbines in the early 1930s while it was being built

Library of Congress/Mads Madsen

Two men testing out a bulletproof vest on September 13, 1932 in Washington, D.C.

Joe Rosenthal/AP Photo/Mads Madsen

U.S. Marines raising the American flag during the 1945 Battle of Iwo Jima

Margaret Bourke-White/Getty/Sanna Dullaway

People lining up to seek food and clothing from a Kentucky relief station during the Great Ohio River Flood of 1937

Alexander Gardner/Library of Congress/Mads Madsen

The last living photograph of President Abraham Lincoln in 1865

Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress/Mads Madsen

An unemployed lumber worker goes with his wife to the bean harvest in August of 1939

Mads Madsen

George Orwell

Toni Frissell/Library of Congress/Agnoiologist

A model floating in the water at Weeki Wachee Spring, Florida in 1947

Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress/Jordan Lloyd

Men at a country store in Gordonton, North Carolina in 1939

Malcolm Browne/AP Photo/Sanna Dullaway

A Buddhist monk, burns himself to death on a Saigon street to protest alleged persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government in 1963

Ruth Orkin/Getty/Mads Madsen

Albert Einstein at a Princeton University luncheon in 1953

Library of Congress/Kibblenbits

Portrait of photographer Dorothea Lange atop a car with her holding a giant camera in February of 1936

Mads Madsen

Mark Twain

Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress/Mads Madsen

Florence Owens Thompson and her children in 1936 in Nipomo, California

Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums/Sanna Dullaway

Mauretania’s first Chief Engineer, John Currie, and other gentlemen in 1909 at the Canada Dock, Liverpool

Seth Kinman/Wikimedia/Mads Madsen

The 1865 photograph above shows Seth Kinman, a California hunter and trapper, sitting in a chair that he later presented to President Andrew Johnson

Roger Higgins/Library of Congress/Mads Madsen

Salvador Dali with ocelot and cane photographed in 1965

Wikimedia/Mads Madsen

Charlie Chaplin

U.S. Department of Defense/Sanna Dullaway

A nuclear weapons test being conducted by the United States in 1946 at Bikin Atoll

Wikimedia/Sanna Dullaway

Participants of the 1927 invitation-only Solvay Conference, where the world’s most notable physicists met to discuss the newly formulated quantum theory

Mads Madsen

Charles Darwin