School Sends Letter To Parents And Students Asking Them Not To Spoil The Endgame

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In case you hadn’t heard, Avengers: Endgame is out now, and although thousands of people flooded to the cinema on opening night, there’s still some of us who are yet to see the film. 

But to protect fans from hearing the main plot points from anyone other than the Avengers themselves, Marvel are appealing for cinemagoers not to spoil the Endgame.

The Russo brothers recently shared a video of some of the main cast members spreading the message, with the added warning that they’re watching us.

Check it out:

Thankfully, most people are taking the request seriously, and personally I’ve been lucky enough to avoid hearing any spoilers so far.

Lanier High School of Sugar Hill, Georgia, even went the extra mile to ensure its staff and pupils were protected from anyone looking to spoil the Endgame, as they sent out a letter asking everyone to be considerate.

It was addressed to parents and guardians, and read:

As you most likely already know, tonight is the release of a movie in a series that has been built up for over 10 years: Avengers Endgame.

We as administrators understand the magnitude of an event like this, and we also understand how important this sort of thing can be to students.

Many student have acquired tickets to view the film tonight, April 25th, meaning they will be in school Friday with knowledge of the events that take place in the movie.[sic]

The letter continued:

Because of this, we ask that NO student share any information regarding the film and its contents in order to perserve the confidentiality of the movie and to allow those who are not seeing it tonight a chance to see it how the please. Thank you for your compliance.

#DontSpoilEndgame

The letter was shared on Reddit, where some people pointed out that asking the kids not to share spoilers might be the very thing that would encourage them to share them.

One person responded:

That’s weird approach. Instead of saying NO, they should’ve explain why spoiling is bad.

Saying NO is just asking for the opposite. They’re kids after all. But if the parents, guardians, or teachers ask their kids/students to have some empathy to those who wants to watch (at that day) but can’t and how that might upset them, the kids might not spoiling it [sic] (not guaranteed) and might learn one or two things about empathy.

The school didn’t mention if there’d be any sort of punishment for students who did go around shouting spoilers, but hopefully they had a plan in place!

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Emily Brown

Emily Brown

Emily Brown first began delivering important news stories aged just 13, when she launched her career with a paper round. She graduated with a BA Hons in English Language in the Media from Lancaster University, and went on to become a freelance writer and blogger. Emily contributed to The Sunday Times Travel Magazine and Student Problems before becoming a journalist at UNILAD, where she works on breaking news as well as longer form features.