Sherlock Co-Creator Teases His Perfect Ending To The Series

0 Shares
BBC

With just a few days to go until Sherlock finally returns to our screens – three episodes every two years is never enough – one of the series co-creators has revealed how he’d like the hit show to end.

Sherlock Holmes fanboy and the series showrunner, Mark Gatiss, has outlined his rough idea for how he’d end the popular BBC show and don’t worry he’s no intention on ending it anytime soon.

Responding to ever present rumours that the shows two leads, Sherlock (Bendict Cumberbatch) and Watson (Martin Feeman), were getting too busy to appear in the show Gatiss explained: ‘we certainly don’t want to wave goodbye to something like [Sherlock] lightly’.

He then went through his lovely idea for a final series which, as expected from someone like Gatiss who adores the entire Sherlock Holmes franchise, pays tribute to the series that came before it.

He said:

Right at the beginning, we said, wouldn’t it be fun — because we start with the first meeting, which is very rarely dramatized (sic) — if we actually ended up with them at the same age as Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce?

That would be a really interesting place to be with Benedict and Martin, having started so early in their careers as young men.

So it seems that we could have the world’s rudest detective and his confirmed bachelor sidekick on our screens for a while yet, especially as Rathbone was 54 years old when he made his final appearance as the consulting detective.

That’d give our man Cumberbatch, 40, another 15 years before he hangs up his deerstalker.

All that said though Gatiss does recognise that sometimes enough is enough saying: ‘there is a great precedent for leaving well alone. Fawlty Towers is twelve episodes, with four years apart. And it’s perfect.’

Well Cumberbatch is hardly likely to be short of work following Doctor Strange is he?


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.