Geologist Claims To Have Found Jesus’s Tomb, Here’s What It Looks Like

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A rather bold geologist claims to have proof he’s found the tomb of Jesus Christ in East Jerusalem.

According to The Sun the controversial claims come from Dr Aryeh Shimron who believes he found the tomb of Christ in an area called Talpiot Tomb, all the way back in 1980.

Shimron claims that there are actually nine coffins in the tomb, and that they all bare the names of those with links to the New Testament of the Bible on them.

Film Director Claims To Have Found The Tomb Of JesusGetty

Since then has been working to prove his claims and believes he now has proof that the tomb belongs not just to Jesus but also his wife Mary Magdalene and son Judah.

The idea that Christ married and had children is extremely controversial amongst Christians who believe that Jesus was resurrected by his dad/self, God.

Unsurprisingly not everyone believes Shimron’s claims believing that the names on the tomb were pretty common at the time they were buried so this tomb may not contain God’s mortal family.

Film Director Claims To Have Found The Tomb Of ChristGetty

Complicating matters is an Israeli collector who in the 1970s bought a burial box with ‘James son of Joseph brother of Jesus’ inscribed on it.

Using chemical analysis Shimron believes he’s matched elements in soil samples from the tomb and the collectors box, proving the two are linked.

He explained:

I think I’ve got really powerful, virtually unequivocal evidence that the James ossuary spent most of its lifetime, or death time, in the Talpiot Tomb.

Yeah this is far too controversial a topic for a pithy outro…


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.