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Influencer Kris Schatzel Responds To Backlash Over Controversial Black Lives Matter Protest Photo

by : Niamh Shackleton on : 07 Jun 2020 15:44
Influencer Kris Schatzel Responds To Backlash Over Controversial Black Lives Matter Protest PhotoInfluencer Kris Schatzel Responds To Backlash Over Controversial Black Lives Matter Protest Photo@influencersinthewild/Instagram

Influencer Kris Schatzel has responded to public backlash regarding her controversial Black Lives Matter protest photo.

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A video of the influencer went viral after she was spotting stepping into a crowd of protesters holding a Black Lives Matter sign for what appeared to be a quick photo opportunity.

Schatzel was dressed to the nines for the photo in a long black dress, heeled boots and wearing bright red lipstick.

After seeing the video, many people voiced their insult and disappointment, and pointed to the video as an example of people misunderstanding the purpose of the current global protests.

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One person wrote:

This is ridiculous, disgusting and so insulting. And is the exact real life depiction of why these protest and rallies are happening.

Can we have this “influencer” tagged so we can give her the words she needs to hear on this trash ass behavior.

Another described it as an example of ‘fake support’, writing:

Next movement should be to stop giving “influencers” attention and maybe they will actually learn to give a dam about anything else other than likes and follows. It’s sick to see these people trying to feed off of this with fake support.

InfluencerInfluencer@rusabnb/Instagram

Schatzel has made her Instagram private following the backlash, but before doing so addressed the matter.

As per Dazed, she said:

I truly believe this level on [sic] intolerance and hateful comments are detrimental to the movement and what we are all trying to achieve for black and brown communities.

I hope we can all we can all focus on the true cause as to why we are all here.

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Schatzel isn’t the only influencer who’s been called out for using the protests as a form of publicity.

One white woman posed with a drill while pretending to help a man board up broken windows. After her male companion took the photo, she simply handed the drill back, thanked the man and got back into a car.

These are just two of many posts on social media from the past week that exemplify performative allyship, a form of poor allyship that benefits the supposed ally more than the cause.

Ben O’Keefe, an activist and former senior aide to Senator Elizabeth Warren, explained how to be a good white ally.

As per Vox, he said:

Allyship is language, and being a co-conspirator is about doing the work. It’s taking on the issue of racism and oppression as your own issue, even though you’ll never truly understand the damage that it does.

Ben added that people should ‘listen more than you speak’ and to ‘do your research’.

Let’s hope that some influencers take note of these words in the future.

If you have been affected by any of the issues in this article and wish to speak to someone in confidence, contact Stop Hate UK by visiting their website www.stophateuk.org/talk

Niamh Shackleton

Niamh Shackleton is a pint sized person and journalist at UNILAD. After studying Multimedia Journalism at the University of Salford, she did a year at Caters News Agency as a features writer in Birmingham before deciding that Manchester is (arguably) one of the best places in the world, and therefore moved back up north. She's also UNILAD's unofficial crazy animal lady.

Topics: Life, Black Lives Matter, influencers, Kris Schatzel, Now, Social Media, White Ally

Credits

Influencers In The Wild/Instagram and 2 others
  1. Influencers In The Wild/Instagram

    @influencersinthewild

  2. Dazed

    An influencer responds to backlash for a Black Lives Matter protest selfie

  3. Vox

    How to be a good white ally, according to activists