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Pub Bans Men Wearing ‘Jobby Catchers’ And Shoes With No Socks

by : Niamh Shackleton on : 31 Jan 2020 10:55
Pub dress codePub dress codePexels/SWNS

A pub has banned ‘jobby catcher’ grey tracksuits, rolled up jeans and shoes with no socks – and some people have mixed opinions on it.

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The Dreadnought boozer in Leith, Edinburgh, describes itself as ‘old skool’ and ‘a pub that knows how to party’.

It won the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) City of Edinburgh Pub of the Year award in 2018 and 2019.

Pub Bans Men Wearing 'Jobby Catchers' And Shoes With No SocksPub Bans Men Wearing 'Jobby Catchers' And Shoes With No SocksSWNS

But the trendy pub has raised eyebrows by putting a sign in the window – telling men they will not be allowed in if they are dressed head-to-toe in grey marl trackies, or wearing shoes with no socks.

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The pub is also considering a ban on flip-flops, which – in my opinion – you shouldn’t wear anywhere but on holiday anyway.

A sign, reading ‘gentlemen’s dress code’ depicted a man dressed in a grey tight-fitting tracksuit cuffed at the ankles and trainers, described as ‘jobby catchers’.

Pub Bans Men Wearing 'Jobby Catchers' And Shoes With No SocksPub Bans Men Wearing 'Jobby Catchers' And Shoes With No SocksSWNS

Another image showed a man wearing a leather jacket and turned-up jeans, with bare ankles and smart shoes – circled in red to draw attention to the fashion faux pas.

The move was welcomed by some people – who called for the ban to be extended to other items of clothing, however others have said it’s ‘bonkers’.

Nathan from London told UNILAD: 

Pubs banning certain clothes sets a strange precedent for me. Feels like they are targeting certain individuals – it’s almost like assuming some people’s money is better than others. In a pub, everyone pays the same price for a beer, so why, because someone’s dresses differently, does that make them a less valuable customer?

Pub Bans Men Wearing 'Jobby Catchers' And Shoes With No SocksPub Bans Men Wearing 'Jobby Catchers' And Shoes With No SocksPexels
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Alexander from Manchester agrees with Nathan. He said to UNILAD: 

If this pub fancies themselves a finer establishment compared to most common locals, I could see their argument for trying to ban such a relaxed dress-sense. However, I think it’s all a little bonkers. If someone is giving you their custom for a few pints and/or some food, let them wear what they want to wear.

It’s crazy to think a pub won’t take some extra money because a young fella rolled his jeans two-fold and wore  some invisible socks underneath his trainers. It’s hilarious.

Scott from Blackpool agreed as well with his straight-to-the-point comment. He said to UNILAD

Pubs shouldn’t have such criteria. You go there for a pint, not f*cking caviar.

Pub Bans Men Wearing 'Jobby Catchers' And Shoes With No SocksPub Bans Men Wearing 'Jobby Catchers' And Shoes With No SocksPexels

I mean – he’s not wrong. While you can understand the Dorchester having a dress code (it does), but a local pub in Edinburgh? Maybe not so much.

In response to the attention the pub’s dress code rules has received, Toby – owner of the Dreadnought – didn’t have huge amounts to add, but argued some people have taken it ‘far too seriously’.

Speaking to UNILAD, he said: 

Some folk are taking it far too seriously and we really just wanted to make sure that Olly Murs wouldn’t come to the pub.

So, if your name is Olly Murs, you’re probably best staying away from the Dreadnought Pub in Edinburgh – but I’m sure the Slug and Lettuce would let you in.

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Niamh Shackleton

Niamh Shackleton is a pint sized person and journalist at UNILAD. After studying Multimedia Journalism at the University of Salford, she did a year at Caters News Agency as a features writer in Birmingham before deciding that Manchester is (arguably) one of the best places in the world, and therefore moved back up north. She's also UNILAD's unofficial crazy animal lady.

Topics: Life, controversial, Dress Code, drinking, Edinburgh, Pub