Crowds Injured When Lightning Strikes Rock Festival – For The Second Year Running

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Over 50 music fans may have been injured at a rock festival in Germany, when lightning struck the concert for the second year in a row.

According to The Independent the lightning struck on Friday evening and although none of those hurt were in a life threatening condition, more than forty fans were hospitalised.

This includes at least one person who had to be resuscitated by paramedics.

Organisers had warned those attending the Rock am Ring Festival to seek shelter as a severe thunderstorm moved in just after 8pm but police say that at around 8.30pm the lightning struck, injuring ‘many’ people at the site.

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Both firefighters and ambulances were sent to the scene and an emergency information hotline was set up to help those looking for injured relatives.

One of those injured was apparently seen lying in the mud, singed and burnt by the strike, while surrounded by emergency services.

Rock am Ring organisers have said 42 people were hospitalised, including eight with serious injuries, but local media reports that there may be up to 51 people hurt.

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Only last year, at the same festival at least 33 people were injured in a lightning struck at Mendig, western Germany.

The thunderstorms are forecast to continue over Germany in the coming days and are part of the severe storms currently battering mainland Europe which so far have claimed the lives of at least 16 people.

Of those 16 at least 11 people have died in Germany, including a 72-year-old man who, after being rescued from flooding in the village of Triftern, died of a heart attack.

There have also been reported deaths in Romania and Belgium.

Meanwhile in Paris museums, parks and cemeteries have been forced to close after the River Seine reached its highest levels in nearly 35 years, as the city prepares for potential evacuations.


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.