Conspiracy Theorist Explains Weird Reason We Shouldn’t Be Afraid Of Nuclear War

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Ever since the first nuclear bomb was dropped humanity has lived in fear of the power of these dreadful weapons particularly in politically volatile times.

Now with the escalating threat of war in the Middle East and tensions between North Korea and the U.S. at an all time high many are wondering whether the nightmare of a nuclear apocalypse is about to become a terrifying reality.

But thankfully there’s one man who stands a part from the fearful masses saying we don’t need to fear nuclear war The Daily Star reports.

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Why does he think this?

Does he have some insight into the threat of mutually assured destruction? A deeper understanding of the 24 hour news cycle who are paid to keep you afraid? Or perhaps he’s a defence expert who knows nuclear weapons like the back of his hand.

Well if you were hoping for a rationale explanation I’m sorry to disappoint you because the reason this conspiracy theorist isn’t afraid of nukes is because they don’t think these weapons exist.

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Yeah you read that right, he doesn’t think they’re real instead believing they’re a propaganda tool used to frighten our enemies and justify the invasion of other sovereign nations.

What proof does he have that they don’t exist?

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Well I’ll put it like this, if I claimed that fairies existed and then made a YouTube video saying they did because you can’t prove that they don’t then I’d have made a more compelling argument than he did.

Basically his arguments are massively disrespectful to those who died in the Japanese bombings and we should’t entertain them no matter how comforting it would be to have a world without nuclear weapons.


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.