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Elon Musk Says It’s His Fault If SpaceX Rocket Launch Goes Wrong

by : Julia Banim on : 27 May 2020 18:19
Elon Musk Says It's His Fault If SpaceX Rocket Launch Goes WrongElon Musk Says It's His Fault If SpaceX Rocket Launch Goes WrongPA

Elon Musk has opened up about feeling nervous as SpaceX prepares for its very first manned mission into space.

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Weather permitting, NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley will be launched into orbit aboard a Crew Dragon spacecraft atop a Falcon 9 rocket at 4.33pm EDT (8.33 pm GMT) on Wednesday, May 27, embarking on a historic journey to the International Space Station (ISS).

The Demo-2 mission will take off from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, marking the first time astronauts have travelled into orbit in a spacecraft made by a private company. This will also be the first time in nine years that humans have left Earth from American soil.

Check out Musk talking about the launch – and his nerves – here:

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Chatting with CBS This Morning, Musk spoke about his nerves ahead of the mission, admitting the blame would lie at his door if anything went wrong.

Reflecting on his feelings alongside NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, Musk said:

I’m the chief engineer of this thing, so I’d just like to say that if it goes right, it’s credit to the SpaceX-NASA team. If it goes wrong, it’s my fault.

He continued:

This is the culmination of a dream. This is a dream come true. In fact, it feels surreal. If you’d asked me when starting SpaceX if this would happen, I’d be like ‘1% chance, 0.1% chance’.

Elon MuskElon MuskPA Images

Speaking about the importance he and the team have placed on ensuring the safety of the two astronauts, Musk also said:

Thousands of things that can go wrong, and only one thing that can go right. Anything anyone can think of to improve the probability of success, make sure Bob and Doug are safely taken to the Space Station, that is the absolute priority.

In fact, I’ve told the SpaceX team that it’s not just the top priority, it’s the only priority.

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Demo-2 is SpaceX’s final test flight, and is intended to to validate its crew transportation system, including the Crew Dragon, Falcon 9 and launch pad, as well as operations capabilities. It’s anticipated that the mission will lay the groundwork for future manned flights into space.

Throughout the mission, crew members and SpaceX mission controllers will verify the performance of Demo-2’s environmental control system, displays and control system, manoeuvring thrusters and autonomous docking capability.

Behnken and Hurley will remain at the ISS for an extended period of time, however the duration will only be determined upon their safe arrival, and will depend upon factors such as the readiness of the next commercial crew launch.

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Julia Banim

Jules studied English Literature with Creative Writing at Lancaster University before earning her masters in International Relations at Leiden University in The Netherlands (Hoi!). She then trained as a journalist through News Associates in Manchester. Jules has previously worked as a mental health blogger, copywriter and freelancer for various publications.

Topics: News, Bob Behnken, Crew Dragon, Doug Hurley, Elon Musk, Launch, NASA, Now, Rocket Launch, Space, SpaceX

Credits

CBS This Morning/YouTube
  1. CBS This Morning/YouTube

    Elon Musk says SpaceX rocket launch is "a dream come true"