Final Resting Place Of Amelia Earhart Found

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The whereabouts of Amelia Earhart has been solved with ’99 per cent’ certainty according to one scientist. 

The legendary aviator vanished somewhere above the Pacific Ocean during a round-the-world trip in 1937.

Neither Earhart or her navigator, Fred Noonan, were ever found, along with the plane.

However, after decades of speculation, Richard Jantz, of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville – an expert on skeletal biology – claims bones found on a Pacific island in 1940 are ’99 per cent likely’ to be Earhart’s.

They were discovered on the then-Gardner Island – now Nikumaroro – 400 miles south of her destined stopover on Howland Island, report the Mail Online.

They were analysed in British Fiji by Dr David Win Hoodless, who took their measurements before using losing the bones.

Dr Jantz has since compared the measurements to the assumed dimension of Earhart and concluded the two are strikingly similar.

He said:

We had the lengths of three bones Hoodless reported lengths for.

Then we realised there were some ways we could get more information about Amelia Earhart’s dimensions that could be compared directly to the bones. We were able to measure her humerus length and her radius length from a photo that had a scaleable object in it.

Then we also had a good estimate of her tibia length, which we got from her trouser inseam length and from her height. We were able to compare the three bone lengths from Nikumaroro to Amelia Earhart.

The result is they’re very similar and it’s unlikely  just a random person would be that similar.

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Dr Jantz continued:

If her position had been in the middle of that distribution, there’s no way I could have concluded it was her.

The fact she’s not the closest one is not disqualifying at all, because there are going to be measurement errors on my part from estimating her dimensions and it could be Hoodless also made some errors.

Just a random person would have a very low probability of being that similar to the Nikumaroro bones.

It’s a remarkable leap in a conspiracy which has lasted decades.