Here’s How You Can Legally Sneak Drinks Through Airport Security

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Ever wanted to get riggity-riggity-wrecked on a plane but are too cheap to buy any of the airline’s overpriced hooch? Well there’s a way to get booze on the plane legally. 

Unfortunately for all you budding wreck heads out there this trick only works in the U.S. as us Brits get alcohol for free when we fly international, so this advice is just for our U.S. reader, Steve.

Hi Steve, hope things are going a-okay stateside!

Artists interpretation of Steve

Anyway, according to the TSA (the loud and angry security people at the airport) you’re not allowed to bring liquids – let alone alcohol – through security.

However there’s a loophole! You can bring drinks through security checkpoints as long as they’re frozen solid upon crossing the security checkpoint!

This means as long as you can freeze your favourite bev then you can take it on to the plane and enjoy hideous whisky slush while flying 30,000 feet in the air, just like God intended.

Delicious frozen beer slush

Unfortunately if it’s turned into a vodka slushy or started to melt in any way then things get more difficult, as then they have to meet the 3-1-1 requirements, whihc are better known as the rules prohibiting you to carry quart-sized bag of liquids.

To get round this though you could try and bring ice packs to keep your alcohol frozen but again if they’ve started to melt then you’re screwed again.

You know what if I’m honest this whole thing seems massively complicated, if you’re about to get on a flight we’ll presume you’re on holiday. So why not treat yourself?

Or if it’s for work surely this is what expenses are for?

Wonder if this counts as a written warning...

I’ve just been informed by HR and a senior editor that this is not what expenses are for…

Anyway good luck freezing your alcohol Steve! It just occurred to me it doesn’t have to be alcohol…


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.