Here’s What The Tiger Attack In The Walking Dead Looked Like Without CGI

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Walking Dead Season Seven Spoilers!

negan carl the walking deadAMC

Walking Dead fans were on the edge of their seats tonight as Negan and his Saviours once again got the better of Rick and the Alexandria survivors. 

Or at least he thought he had until a tiger attacked them (and you thought Zombies were the main danger in The Walking Dead) along with Maggie, King Ezekiel and the rest of the survivors from the Kingdom and the Hilltop to save the day.

The tiger, Ezekiel’s beloved pet Shiva, tore a bloody path through Negan’s men, forcing the violet thug and his brutish gang away before he had chance to reduce Karl’s head to a fine raspberry jam.

tiger on walking dead is man in blue leotardAMC

Of course there wasn’t really a tiger on set (spoilers the zombies aren’t real either) it was in fact a stuntman, a stuntman in a blue morph suit.

In a behind-the-scenes video AMC revealed how they conjured up the tiger while filming the season seven finale – and it involves the stuntman literally launching himself at the poor Saviours.

The man in the blue suit is Scott Hunter, a 6′ 3″ and 240 pound man whose day job involves pretending to be a tiger and using a trampoline to launch himself into other stuntmen, where do we apply?

Here’s how it looked…

And here’s what actually happened…

The company responsible for turning Scott into a tiger was Rhythm and Hues, whose previous work includes the visual effects behind another famous fictional tiger, Richard Parker, from the Life of Pi.

Maybe the expense of paying for the tiger was the reason they couldn’t get that deer to look realistic…


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.