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K-Pop Fans Flood ‘White Lives Matter’ Hashtag To Drown Out Racist Posts

by : Julia Banim on : 03 Jun 2020 18:06
K-Pop Fans Flood 'White Lives Matter' Hashtag To Drown Out Racist PostsK-Pop Fans Flood 'White Lives Matter' Hashtag To Drown Out Racist PostsPA

K-Pop fans have cleverly used clips of their favourite performers to drown out a racist hashtag that had begun to circulate.

All too predictably, racist posts began to emerge under the hashtag #whitelivesmatter following the Black Lives Matter protests, with white supremacists spreading messages of hate and prejudice.

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However, K-Pop fans were on the case to show the racists they couldn’t win this one. Many shared vids of their favourite K-Pop artists up on stage, sharing messages like, ‘f*ck racists’ and ‘Racists really though we are gonna let them get away with this stupid #’.

Many people were initially perplexed and worried by the hashtag’s popularity, but were left delighted by the K-Pop stans’ ingenuity once they twigged what was going on. Even those who wouldn’t usually listen to K-Pop have expressed their admiration.

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One person tweeted:

We should all appreciate the K-Pop stans right now. We love you.

Another said:

Imagine trying to trend #WhiteLivesMatter like a typical racist and K-Pop fans said ‘Not on my watch b*tch’.

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Many K-Pop fans have been sharing what is known in their fandom as ‘fancams’, close-up footage of a band member during a show, no doubt confusing many racist individuals searching the trending topic.

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The fans have since broadened their campaign to include other hateful hashtags like #MAGA and #BlueLivesMatter; helping to block out the voices of those spreading hateful rhetoric during the ongoing Black Lives Matter protests.

‘White Out Wednesday’ follows the well-intentioned but criticised Black Out Tuesday squares which flooded Instagram.

Although meant to show solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, these squares have since been criticised by various activists for clogging up vital channels of information and updates.

Posting on Twitter, mental health advocate and Black Lives Matter campaigner Kenidra Woods wrote:

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We know that’s it no intent to harm but to be frank, this essentially does harm the message. We use hashtag to keep ppl updated. PLS stop using the hashtag for black images!!

This isn’t the first time in recent days that K-Pop fans have shown support for the Black Lives Matter movement.

Over the weekend, the Dallas Police Department requested people send them footage of ‘illegal activity from the protests’ using the iWatch Dallas app.

However, as reported by The Verge, K-Pop fans rushed to flood the app with – you’ve guessed it – content from their beloved K-Pop stars artists, apparently overloading the reporting system while doing so.

The very next day, the Dallas Police Department confirmed that ‘due to technical difficulties iWatch Dallas app will be down temporarily’.

Replies to both the first and second tweets show various clips from K-pop bands performing, as well a various pop culture, anime and gaming gifs.

As reported by Buzzfeed News, the iWatch Dallas listings received dozens of one-star reviews, with many people using the review section to show support for the Black Lives Matter movement.

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Julia Banim

Jules studied English Literature with Creative Writing at Lancaster University before earning her masters in International Relations at Leiden University in The Netherlands (Hoi!). She then trained as a journalist through News Associates in Manchester. Jules has previously worked as a mental health blogger, copywriter and freelancer for various publications.

Topics: News, Black Lives Matter, K-pop, Now, Racism

Credits

The Verge and 1 other
  1. The Verge

    K-pop stans overwhelm app after Dallas police ask for videos of protesters

  2. Buzzfeed News

    Dallas Police Asked People To Call Out Protesters. People Flooded Their App With K-Pop Instead.