Kim Jong-Un’s ‘Nuke Target’ Revealed And 265,000 People Could Die

0 Shares
South Korea Defense Ministry via AP

It’s been revealed any attempt to launch a military offensive against North Korea by the U.S. could potentially result in the deaths of 265,000 people.

Defence analysts have warned the nuclear capabilities of the ‘rogue’ state mean striking before any action is taken, is not an option.

The experts have also revealed the potential nuclear targets for North Korea if an attack was launched against them.

PA Images

Those places include Los Angeles, Seoul or Tokyo, reports The Daily Star.

Reports also suggest North Korea have recently been successful in a series of nuclear tests, including a H-bomb which caused landslides and other seismic activity.

Harry Kazianis, director of defence studies at the Centre for the National Interest, said the consequences would be ‘horrific’.

PA Images

Kazianis said:

There is not going to be a military strike by the Trump administration on NOrth Korea because the problem is this.

They would target the nuclear facilities and the nuclear weapons, but you need a 100% success rate to make that viable.

If Kim Jong-Un survived that attack with just one or two nuclear weapons, you know what he is going to do, he is going to drop one either on Seoul, Tokyo or Los Angeles.

PA Images

A propaganda photo released by North Korea revealed Californian cities are a major target.

The rising tensions have not prevented inflammatory language from United States President Donald Trump, who has promised ‘fire and fury‘ like the world has never seen.

The UN Security Council have held numerous emergency meetings in the past few weeks to deal with the ratcheting concerns, during which, Washington’s ambassasdor Nikki Haley said North Korea are ‘begging for war’.

north koreaGetty

South Korea has also agreed to more shipments of military gear and weapons from the US.

More missile tests are expected over the weekend to commemorate the anniversary of the creation of the state on 9 September 1948.