Legally You Can Take Time Off Work Because Of The Snow

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Good news if you’re sick of the snow, you can legally use it to get time off work.

As we’ve all probably heard by now, the Beast from the East is just around the corner, with temperatures set to drop lower than the Arctic circle in some places.

Due to this, there’s a decent chance schools and offices across the UK will be forced to close if it is deemed unsafe.

Let’s say it is, and work is a no-go. Do you know your rights?.

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DO I STILL GET PAID?

Yeah mate. While it cannot be marked as a holiday and they can request you to work from home, your boss will still have to pay you if the Beast from the East gets in the way of you and the office.

However, if you’re on a zero hours contract your employers may not have to pay you, reports The Metro. Likewise if there is an advance notice of bad weather, you could give notice to take a holiday and therefore not receive your daily wonga.

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IS MY EMPLOYER LIABLE IF I SLIP AND BREAK BOTH LEGS ON THE SNOW\ICE AT WORK?

OK, well not that drastic but you get what I mean. If I come to work in these conditions and suffer as a result of it, can I shout at my boss and lay blame at the company’s door?

As most work places are required to maintain safe working conditions, employees may be able to complain if there is an otherwise-avoidable accident at work. But no-one likes a grass, do they?

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I HAVE A KID AND HIS SCHOOL IS CLOSED AND BECAUSE HE’S A KID I HAVE TO LOOK AFTER HIM SO HE DOESN’T EAT A TIDE POD – CAN I TAKE THE DAY OFF WORK?

You’re entitled to take a reasonable amount of unpaid time off work to look after your young un’s in the case of an unexpected interruption. Both nursery and school closures qualify as an emergency.

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IS THERE A MINIMUM WORKPLACE TEMPERATURE THAT NEEDS TO BE MET?

Nah mate. Fake news. Some employers are, however, required to maintain a safe working environment.

The Health and Safety Executive recommends a minumum temperature of 16c for workplaces where the nature of work is normally inactive and stationary AKA office jobs. For everywhere else, it’s 13C.

Hope this helps.