Nurses Bend Hospital Rules To Give Patient His One Dying Wish

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Kindly nurses bent the rules for a dying patient who only had hours left to live by allowing him one final glass of wine and cigarette while admiring his last sunset.

75-year-old Carsten Hansen was pictured savouring his final vices on the roof of Aarhus University Hospital in Aarhus, Denmark hours after being told that he was too old for surgery and that he would soon pass away.

Not wanting the old man to die without him enjoying the pleasures left to him nurses wheeled his hospital bed onto a balcony off a public room so he could msoke wihtout breaking hospital rules about smoking.

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Mette Guldbech Demuth, Mr Hansen’s daughter, praised the nurse’s actions in an interview with BT and also paid tribute to her dearly departed dad.

She said: 

My father’s last wish was to be allowed to enjoy his wine and some cigarettes. It was the best thing for him. It meant a lot to him throughout life. He was annoyed that he was not allowed to smoke inside. He really wanted to have his very last cigarette.

I think that the nurses chose to bend the rules because he is human. They showed empathy and tenderness for my father. It also meant a lot to us as a family that my father could have his last wish fulfilled.

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After Mr Hansen passed away hospital staff posted the picture on Facebook after getting permission from Mrs Demuth and other family members.

According to nurse Rikke Kvist Mr Hansen enjoyed a final glass of white wine and cigarette on the evening of April 4, three days before he died.

Ms Kvist added it was a special moment for the family with a cozy and relaxed atmosphere and that while it was tinged with sadness there was a genuine sense of good humour about the event.


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.