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Tesla Founder Elon Musk Donates More Than 1,200 Ventilators To Coronavirus Patients In Los Angeles

by : Julia Banim on : 24 Mar 2020 09:25
PA Images

Elon Musk has sourced and donated 1,255 ventilators to patients in Los Angeles, as part of an effort to help tackle shortages at US medical facilities during the ongoing outbreak.

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This development comes less than one week after the Tesla and SpaceX CEO promised to supply ventilators to those infected by coronavirus.

Medical experts have warned the US now faces a shortage of vital supplies in the months to come, with the number of coronavirus cases continuing to rise. As of Monday, March 23, the state of California had recorded 2,203 confirmed cases of the virus and 43 deaths.

Elon MuskElon MuskPA Images

As per Business Insider, California Governor Gavin Newsom confirmed in a press conference that Musk had delivered more than 1,000 ventilators to California hospitals:

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I told you a few days ago that [Musk] was likely to have 1,000 ventilators this week. They’ve arrived in Los Angeles… It was a heroic effort.

Musk also confirmed the news over Twitter, tweeting:

Yup. China had an oversupply, so we bought 1255 FDA-approved ResMed, Philips & Medtronic ventilators on Friday night & airshipped them to LA. If you want a free ventilator installed, please let us know!

He added:

Thanks Tesla China team, China Customs Authority & LAX customs for acting so swiftly.

Having enough ventilators at medical facilities will be crucial in the fight against coronavirus. The virus attacks the respiratory system and can in some cases compromise a person’s ability to breathe.

Ventilators deliver air to a person’s lungs via a tube placed in their windpipe, and can be essential for saving their life.

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As reported by The New York Times, ventilators can cost as much as $50,000, and American and European manufacturers are currently struggling to speed up production to meet the increasing demand.

VentilatorVentilatorPA

According to a report from Johns Hopkins’ Center for Health Security, the US has approximately 170,000 ventilators, with 160,000 ventilators ready for use as well as around 8,900 held in national reserve.

The American Hospital Association has estimated 960,000 US citizens will require the use of a ventilator over the course of the pandemic, meaning far more will be needed to meet demand.

Over in the UK, the NHS currently has access to 8,175 ventilators, from which 691 are from private hospitals and 35 provided by the Ministry of Defence.

Government officials have now asked UK companies to deliver 5,000 within a month, as per the Financial Times, with 30,000 machines required to support patients who will experience severe respiratory difficulties during the pandemic.

It’s okay to not panic. LADbible and UNILAD’s aim with our coronavirus campaign, Cutting Through, is to provide our community with facts and stories from the people who are either qualified to comment or have experienced first-hand the situation we’re facing. For more information from the World Health Organization on coronavirus, click here.

Julia Banim

Jules studied English Literature with Creative Writing at Lancaster University before earning her masters in International Relations at Leiden University in The Netherlands (Hoi!). She then trained as a journalist through News Associates in Manchester. Jules has previously worked as a mental health blogger, copywriter and freelancer for various publications.

Topics: News, Coronavirus, Elon Musk, Los Angeles, Ventilators

Credits

Center for Health Security and 4 others
  1. Center for Health Security

    Ventilator Stockpiling and Availability in the US

  2. Business Insider

    Elon Musk said he sourced 1,255 ventilators from China and shipped them to Los Angeles as US worries about a shortage in the face of coronavirus

  3. @elonmusk/Twitter

    @elonmusk/Twitter

  4. The New York Times

    There Aren’t Enough Ventilators to Cope With the Coronavirus

  5. Financial Times

    UK government to decide on how to fill shortage of ventilators