The Best Country In The World To Live In Has Been Announced

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Sweden has been announced as the best country in the world to live in, according to the Good Country Index. 

According to the Index, which takes into account 53 separate indicators from sources including the United Nations and the World Bank, Sweden scores highest for positive lifestyle contributions.

This includes prosperity, equality, health, well being, as well as serving the interests of the Swedish people while avoiding damaging other nations and the environment, The Independent reports.

Good Country Index

Simon Anholt, an independent policy adviser who has worked to help develop and implement strategies for enhanced economic, political and cultural engagement with other countries, created the report.

Mr Anholt created the report to try and find ways of encouraging countries to collaborate and co-operate a lot more, and compete a bit less.

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He explained:

A good country is one that successfully contributes to the good of humanity. Of course it must serve the interests of its own people, but never at the expense of other populations or their natural resources: this is the new law of human survival.

So where does the UK sit on the Index? Well it’s good news-bad news on that front. We’re ranked fourth overall just behind Denmark and the Netherlands but our global contribution to peace and security is pretty woeful.

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Mr Anholt explained:

[Britain] isn’t just an island unconnected to the rest of Europe or to the rest of the world. Just like every other country on earth, it is part of one system. If it fails, we all fail.

The good news is though that we’re ranked first for science and technology and second for health and well being.


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.