Young Girl’s Emotional Reunion With Family Three Years After ISIS Abduction

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Steven Nabil

An Iraqi Christian girl has been reunited with her family after three years being held hostage by Daesh militants.

According to Steven Nabil, an American journalist in Iraq, Christina Abada was just three-years-old when she was taken from her family by so called Islamic State fighters as they stormed Mosul and Qaraqosh.

Iraqi security forces managed to free Christina after fighting with militants in west Mosul and she was returned to her delighted family who’ve been living in a refugee camp near Erbil.

The Iraqi Christian Relief Council (ICRC) founder and president Juliana Taimoorazy told Fox News how happy she is that Christina is back with her family.

عودة كريستينا المخطوفة الى اهلها و استقبالها الان بعد تحريرها من الموصلشكرا لله على سماع دعاء امها المسكينةشكرا للقوات الامنية التي مكنت هذا الحدث العظيم#ننتصر_او_ننتصر#بشائر_من_الموصل

Posted by ‎ستيفن نبيل :: Steven Nabil‎ on Friday, 9 June 2017

She said:

With the freedom of Christina, now 6-years-old, we have renewed hope for a brighter future for all those who paid a heavy price for being Christian.

In every presentation, across the globe, I have spoken of baby Christina and the heartache her parents lived with since the time of her capture. [T]his is a happy day.

During their invasion of Mosul, ISIS fighters rounded up Iraqi Christians who refused to leave the city under the pretence of  medical checkups. It was during these ‘check-ups’ that Christina’s mother Ayda noticed her daughter.

One of the jihadists then snatched Christina from Ayda and walked away. When Ayda demanded that her daughter be returned she was told that Christina was now with the Amir and that she should leave or she’d be killed.

That was the last time Ayda saw Christina until this Friday when she was brought back to them. Christina’s parents have said they now want to emigrate and put this ordeal behind them.


Tom Percival

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.