unilad
Advert

Bright Pink Snow In Italian Alps Is A Cute Sign Of Environmental Disaster

by : Emma Rosemurgey on : 08 Jul 2020 17:12
Bright Pink Snow In Italian Alps Is A Cute Sign Of Environmental DisasterShutterstock

When something presents itself in an attractive way, it can be easy to assume it must be a good thing.

So when you first look at these pictures of seemingly pink snow falling on the top of the Alps, your first thought, like mine was, is probably ‘cute!’.

Advert

Usually, pink snow can only be found in spring and summer, when there is the right amount of light, water and warmth for algae to grow. It will remain under the snow and ice until melting season begins, when the snow washes away to reveal the pink beneath.

Bright Pink Snow In Italian Alps Is A Cute Sign Of Environmental DisasterShutterstock

In the past, this beautiful phenomenon usually wouldn’t be much cause for concern, but this time is very different.

According to Biagio Di Mauro, a researcher at the Institute of Polar Sciences at Italy’s National Research Council, the most recent pink snow spotted on Presena Glacier in the Alps could be having an impact on snowmelt.

Advert

This is because the pink snow – more commonly known as watermelon snow – isn’t as good at reflecting the sun’s rays as the white snow. Therefore, it is less effective at keeping things cool.

Obviously, this isn’t good news for the polar and mountain regions, which are already suffering at the hands of climate change.

Bright Pink Snow In Italian Alps Is A Cute Sign Of Environmental DisasterShutterstock

In fact, some alarming research published last year predicted that as much as half of the Alps’ glaciers could disappear in this century as temperatures continue to rise.

Advert

Speaking to Earther, Di Mauro explained: ‘Less solid precipitation during winter and higher air temperatures during spring and summer are expected to favour the formation of snow- and glacier-algae,’ however he added that there’s ‘little information on this aspect.’

While many of us will have never seen watermelon snow bloom, the Presena Glacier bloom isn’t alone this year, with several other blooms popping up in Alaska and Galindez Island off northern Antarctica.

Bright Pink Snow In Italian Alps Is A Cute Sign Of Environmental DisasterShutterstock

However, algae isn’t the only reason snow and ice have turned pink in recent years. In 2019, glaciers in New Zealand turned pink as a result of devastating bushfires that unfolded in neighbouring Australia. Sadly, the result is much the same, though, as ash – like algae – absorbs the heat and in turn leads to more snow and ice melting.

Advert

As we learn more about this phenomenon, some scientists have argued that watermelon snow bloom needs to be built into climate models so we can gain more understanding on what kind of effects it could cause to the future of global warming.

If you have a story you want to tell, send it to UNILAD via [email protected]

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Celebrity

Rapper DMX Dies Aged 50

Emma Rosemurgey

Emma Rosemurgey is an NCTJ trained Journalist who started her career by producing The Royal Rosemurgey newspaper in 2004, which kept her family up to date with the goings on of her sleepy north east village. She graduated from the University of Central Lancashire in Preston and started her career in regional newspapers before joining Tyla (formerly Pretty 52) in 2017, and progressing onto UNILAD in 2019.

Topics: Science, Climate Change, Now

Credits

Earther
  1. Earther

    Pink Snow in the Italian Alps Is a Cute Sign of Environmental Catastrophe