Medical Company Introduces Hands-Free ‘Sperm Extractor’ For Donors

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Hands-free technology has come on leaps and bounds in recent years, with virtual home assistants needing nothing more than a few words to complete tasks for us lazy humans.

One hospital in China has taken this a step further, in the name of science of course, and invented a machine to give patients the ease of hands-free sperm donation.

It’s known as the automatic sperm extractor, and is apparently designed for patients who feel uncomfortable masturbating in a hospital, or for those having difficulty retrieving sperm the usual, hands-on way.

The machines are currently installed in a hospital in Nanjing, the capital of the Jiangsu province.

It can be altered according to the patient’s height, while speed, frequency, amplitude and temperature are all controllable too. There’s even a screen on top for those needing extra stimulation.

According to doctors, the machine is designed to help those with infertility issues, as the sperm can be analysed after it has been extracted.

Check it out:

The company behind the machine says it replicates a human vagina by varying the ‘temperature, wetness, and amount of light’, as well as being to replicate sexual intercourse by adjusting speed and force.

Zhu Guoxin, director of the urology department at the Zhengzhou Central Hospital, said, via Medical Daily:

When male infertility patient come for treatment, we must first fully inspect the sperm which requires sperm extraction.

This machine is only recommended for patients that had difficulty retrieving sperm, user must use a condom, but lubricant and chemicals on condoms will affect the accuracy of the test results.

According to MailOnline, the machines originally went on sale for $2,800, with the company saying ‘it can give patients a very comfortable feeling’.

Of course, there are other machines on the market that can have similar results for the user, though these are often not found in hospitals and aren’t frequently used in the name of science.

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Charlie Cocksedge

Charlie Cocksedge

Charlie Cocksedge is a journalist at UNILAD. He graduated from the University of Manchester with an MA in Creative Writing, where he learnt how to write in the third person, before getting his NCTJ. His work has also appeared in such places as The Guardian, PN Review and the bin.