Scotland Just Generated Enough Renewable Energy To Power Itself For A Week

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Scotland has just set a new renewable energy record as wind power provides the equivalent of 118 per cent of the nation’s electricity.

According to an independent conservation group, in the first six months of 2017, enough power was generated by the wind turbines to supply more power than Scotland demanded for six days.

WWF Scotland analysed the data provided by WeatherEnergy and found that wind turbines provided 1,039,001 MWh of electricity during June, enough to power nearly three million homes.

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Dr Sam Gardner, acting director of WWF Scotland, said in a statement:

The first six months of 2017 have certainly been incredible for renewables, with wind turbines alone helping to ensure millions of tonnes of climate-damaging carbon emissions were avoided.

Scotland is continuing to break records on renewable electricity, attracting investment, creating jobs and tackling climate change.

If we want to reap the same rewards in the transport and heating sectors, we need the Scottish Government to put in place strong policies on energy efficiency and transport in the forthcoming Climate Change Bill.

The group are asking people to tell First Minister Nicola Sturgeon they want a strong climate bill that will ensure Scotland has a low-carbon power economy.

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Karen Robinson, of WeatherEnergy, said:

It’s great to see this data confirm that Scotland is knocking it out of the park on wind power with total output for June in particular up on the same period compared to the past two years.

There’s no doubt renewables are helping households increasingly avoid fossil fuels for their electricity needs.

It appears that Scotland really is leading the way when it comes to renewable energy – let’s hope that other countries follow suit.


Emily Murray

Emily Murray

Emily Murray is a journalist at UNILAD. She graduated from the University of Leeds with a BA in English Literature and History before studying for a Masters in Journalism at the University of Salford. Emily has previously worked for the BBC, ITV and Trinity Mirror. When Emily isn't writing about topics including mental health and entertainment, you can find her at the cinema which is her second home.