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Artist’s Picture Of ‘The Whole Universe’ Is Absolutely Incredible

by : Tom Percival on : 06 Jan 2016 13:28
Universe featuredUniverse featuredtelegraph.co.uk

An artist has used NASA images to create an incredible image of what our universe may look like.

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This amazing piece was the work of South American artist Pablo Carlos Budassi who used previous images from NASA and logarithmic maps to create the stunning picture. This is a fancy way of saying that each ring of the circle represents sections of space considerably bigger than the one before it.

In the picture we can see our own familiar solar system at the centre. Moving out, we begin to see galaxies like the Milky Way and Andromeda.

2FD1702300000578-3385768-An_artist_used_logarithmic_maps_and_satellite_images_to_created_-m-30_14520181283822FD1702300000578-3385768-An_artist_used_logarithmic_maps_and_satellite_images_to_created_-m-30_1452018128382Pablo Carlos Budassi

Finally we hit what looks like a spider’s web made of fire but is, in fact, the outer edge of the universe which is plasma created by the Big Bang.

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Budassi told Tech Insider he got the idea for the picture while drawing images of space for his son’s birthday.

He said:

That day the idea of a logarithmic view came and in the next days I was able to [assemble] it with photoshop using images from NASA and some textures created by my own.

As incredible as this picture is though, it isn’t to scale so we wouldn’t recommend using it as a map to find your way around the universe…

Tom Percival

More of a concept than a journalist, Tom Percival was forged in the bowels of Salford University from which he emerged grasping a Masters in journalism. Since then his rise has been described by himself as ‘meteoric’ rising to the esteemed rank of Social Editor at UNILAD as well as working at the BBC, Manchester Evening News, and ITV. He credits his success to three core techniques, name repetition, personality mirroring, and never breaking off a handshake.

Topics: Science

Credits

Tech Insider and 2 others