These Are The Black Friday Hacks You Need To Know About

0 Shares
Getty

Black Friday is fast approaching and so one of Britain’s top money saving experts has published a list of hacks which will help you take advantage of the sales.

Each year on the day following Thanksgiving in America, the fourth Thursday of November, Black Friday takes place meaning it will be happening this Friday.

Regarded as the beginning of the hectic Christmas shopping season, retailers are expecting to rake in up to £8 billion this weekend as Black Friday rolls into Cyber Monday.

shoppingPixabay

Emma Bradley, a money saving expert who runs the blog Mum’s Savvy Savings, says there is a way to ‘beat the system’ and bag the biggest deals stores don’t want shoppers to know about.

These hacks including clearing your internet browsing history, placing products in your online the basket the day before, setting up price alerts and researching prices so you know whether or not the deal is a real bargain or not.

She also encourages people to ‘know their rights’ emphasising they should read the terms and conditions on all Black Friday purchases.

phone online shoppingPixabay

Working with electrical retailer AO ahead of Black Friday, Emma advised the following to shoppers:

It may have started as a tradition in the US, but Black Friday has crossed the pond and is here to stay. The day has become an integral part of UK retailers’ marketing strategy to get us spending more sooner.

Last year saw a rise in spending and this year I imagine new records will be set, too.

The basket will also update the following day with the new reduced prices. Some retailers have gotten wise to this and empty baskets after a period of time but it could still be worth a try if you are researching the night before.

As well as clearing your history Emma advises you make sure you also do the same with your cookies as it could affect the prices you are presented with saying ‘this is especially true when booking experience-based gifts, such as trips and stays in hotels’.

Adding that shoppers should make sure they set up price alerts and know their rights, Emma said:

Sites like uk.camelcamelcamel.com can help you track this, and will notify you when the product drops to the price you want to pay.

And knowing your rights is important because as a consumer you still have your legal rights even if bought during Black Friday.

Under the Consumer Contracts Regulations, you can cancel an online order up to 14 days from the time the goods are delivered to you, therefore if you do change your mind you are still protected.

Personally, I find the best deals to be had on Black Friday are on electrical goods. Last year I bought a GHD straighteners and hairdryer set for around the £110 mark, which was my best deal.

Just make sure you research prices first and if you know deals are about to go live, ensure you are at your laptop ready!

fingers on keyboardPixabay

As always the best deals are found online as opposed to the high street so Emma is telling people to keep refreshing pages as websites update their deals.

Understanding it is easy to get caught up in it all, Emma says planning is key concluding:

I would encourage shoppers to plan ahead and create a list of what they are looking to buy to moderate their spending.

Black Friday is turning into one of the biggest spending days in the UK. However be aware that you don’t get caught up in the frenzy.

Buying online can feel a bit too easy, as if we are not spending actual money, especially if our debit cards are automatically stored and we don’t even input the details. It is only when the money has left our banks that it feels real.

I will certainly be bearing this in mind when I start shopping for both Christmas and myself!

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via [email protected]


Emily Murray

Emily Murray

Emily Murray is a journalist at UNILAD. She graduated from the University of Leeds with a BA in English Literature and History before studying for a Masters in Journalism at the University of Salford. Emily has previously worked for the BBC, ITV and Trinity Mirror. When Emily isn't writing about topics including mental health and entertainment, you can find her at the cinema which is her second home.