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TikToker With Breathing Problems Shuts Down Face Mask Argument

by : Emily Brown on : 29 Jun 2020 14:48
TikToker With Breathing Problems Shuts Down Face Mask ArgumentTikToker With Breathing Problems Shuts Down Face Mask ArgumentEmily Lyoness/TikTok

A TikTok user with breathing problems shut down those arguing against the use of face masks by pointing out that if she can wear them, so can most people.

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Face masks have become mandatory in many places across the globe, with UK residents obligated to wear them on public transport, shop owners requiring customers to cover their faces, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urging US residents to wear a mask every time they go out in public.

While the coverings can quite literally save lives by helping prevent the spread of coronavirus, which is passed from person to person through droplets in the air, for some reason not everyone is on board with wearing them.

TikTok user Emily Lyoness explained why that’s ridiculous:

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In a video shared online, Emily explained she has ‘moderate-to-severe asthma given the time of year’. She helps keep her breathing problems under control by taking two lots of medication and having an inhaler on hand, but for her own safety she also owns a pulse oximeter; a small device that measures how much oxygen your blood is carrying.

Using the oximeter, Emily explained that the amount of oxygen in her blood was at 99% when she was wearing no mask. She then demonstrated how wearing a mask affected the amount of oxygen in the blood by trying three different face coverings. Spoiler alert: it remained at 99% throughout.

TikTok user shows blood oxygen at 99% when she wears a face maskTikTok user shows blood oxygen at 99% when she wears a face mask@emilylyoness/TikTok

Bringing her point home, she said:

In other words, if somebody like me with breathing problems can wear all three of these masks throughout the day and have the same oximetry rate, then somebody without breathing problems has no other excuse not to wear a mask, other than their own selfish motivation and un-empathetic way of being.

While there may be some people out there whose health genuinely doesn’t allow them to wear a mask, for the most part those trying to resist are doing so simply because they don’t like being told what to do.

One man fought against face masks by stating he ‘would not be muzzled like a dog’, while elsewhere a Facebook group called the Freedom to Breathe Agency has been making ‘Face Mask Exempt’ cards to try and get people out of wearing masks.

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According to the Daily Dot, the Facebook page has been sharing conspiracy theories alleging wearing face masks is detrimental to human health.

The exemption cards feature a Department of Justice logo, though they are not official, and they claim face masks pose a ‘mental and/or physical risk’ to the wearer.

Dr. Mark Fox, with the St. Joseph County Health Department, told ABC57 the ‘only case in which [some health impacts have] been demonstrated is with a really tight-fitting respirator like an N-95 respirator’ when worn for a long period of time; otherwise, there are no negative health impacts to those who use masks in public, even if you have to wear them all day long.

Face masks might be uncomfortable or unpleasant to wear, but doing so can help prevent both yourself and others from catching the virus and potentially becoming fatally ill. Choosing not to do so for the sake of an argument is downright selfish.

It’s okay to not panic about everything going on in the world right now. LADbible and UNILAD’s aim with our campaign, Cutting Through, is to provide our community with facts and stories from the people who are either qualified to comment or have experienced first-hand the situation we’re facing. For more information from the World Health Organization, click here.

Emily Brown

Emily Brown first began delivering important news stories aged just 13, when she launched her career with a paper round. She graduated with a BA Hons in English Language in the Media from Lancaster University, and went on to become a freelance writer and blogger. Emily contributed to The Sunday Times Travel Magazine and Student Problems before becoming a journalist at UNILAD, where she works on breaking news as well as longer form features.

Topics: Health, Asthma, breathing, Coronavirus, COVID-19, face mask, Now

Credits

Emily Lyoness/TikTok and 2 others
  1. Emily Lyoness/TikTok

    @emilylyoness

  2. Daily Dot

    Don’t let this face mask exemption card fool you

  3. ABC57

    Can face masks harm your health?